Experiential and Strategic Treatment of Depression:

The Power of Focus and Experiential Learning in Teaching Mood Regulation Skills
April 27th to 29th, 2017

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Dr. Michael D. Yapko

The rate of depression is rising in Canada and elsewhere around the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is currently the second greatest cause of human suffering and disability. That observation alone tells us how serious and pervasive the problem of depression is. What are we learning about the factors that cause and spread depression across cross-national and demographic boundaries? The evidence is substantial that biology is less a factor in its spread than many have assumed and that social forces – including familial and cultural forces –are the greater factor. Simply prescribing an antidepressant alone is becoming the virtual definition of under-treatment. Psychotherapy as both a means of treatment and prevention has never been more necessary. But, not just any type of psychotherapy will do.

Experiential and Strategic Treatment of Depression is a three-day workshop that emphasizes the importance of utilizing active and well-targeted interventions when treating individuals suffering with depression. How you as a clinician think about and address fundamental questions – such as what causes depression and where treatment should best be aimed – naturally determines what treatment approach you are most likely to take. Regardless of whatever preferred orientation one might have, however, depression experts are virtually unanimous in their agreement that treatment needs to be multi-dimensional and active. Furthermore, the more we learn about the neuroscience of depression, especially neuroplasticity and neurogenesis, the more important well designed experiential learning processes become in treatment. These include the use of task assignments and focusing processes such as hypnosis and mindfulness.

Dr. Yapko’s well-known books on depression, which include Keys to Unlocking Depression, Depression is Contagious, Hypnosis and Treating Depression, Hand-Me-Down Blues, and Breaking the Patterns of Depression, have each broken new ground in one meaningful way or another. Dr. Yapko provides comprehensive and practical methods for understanding depression and its treatment using many of the latest research findings combined with his strong sense of pragmatism regarding effectiveness.

Lecture, discussion, video case examples, and structured skill-building exercises will be provided during the training. The emphasis will be on enhancing treatment skills.

More details on this workshop

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the epidemiology of depression and relate the rising rates to social factors.
  • Identify key interpersonal patterns that cause and maintain depression in children, couples and families.
  • Identify the role of cognitive style in the onset of depression.
  • Identify individual client’s depressogenic patterns as therapeutic targets.
  • Develop specific active intervention strategies, especially hypnosis and task assignments, for facilitating recovery.
  • Understand the interface between individual and marital and family interventions in treating depression.
  • Design structured homework assignments to build the multi-dimensional skills needed to recover and also reduce the risk of relapse.
  • Identify opportunities for implementing preventive strategies.

Early Bird Cost:

Until April 1st, 2017

Individual Registration: $330
CCC Alumni: $300
Full Time Student: $200

Regular Cost:

On/After April 1st, 2017

Individual Registration: $400
CCC Alumni: $350
Full Time Student: $300

Location:

Workshop to take place in Calgary. Specific location to be determined in March.

Register Online:

Individual
Student
CCC Alumni

The Discriminating Therapist:

The “How” Question and Ways Bad decisions Can Give Rise to Peoples’ Problems
June 2nd to 3rd, 2017

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Dr. Michael D. Yapko

Psychologists, especially cognitive psychologists and cognitive neuroscientists, use the term “discrimination” to describe the process of making distinctions between different situations that then give rise to one’s reactions. For example, your reaction will be entirely different if you believe someone stepped on your foot by accident than if you believe he or she did so deliberately. Your ability to discriminate an intentional act of harm from a moment of mere clumsiness helps shape your reaction of either anger or tolerance toward the person.

Cognitive psychology, the study of how people think, has given rise to new understandings about how people gather and use information. This includes how people decide, usually at a level outside of awareness, what is salient to pay attention to in a given environment and, likewise, what is essentially irrelevant. When people get sidetracked into irrelevancy, paying too much attention to what doesn’t really matter and too little attention to what does, their perceptions and responses naturally lead them astray. More important, when someone’s perspective is so global or over-general that he or she simply doesn’t know how or what to decide, he or she is far more likely to make poor decisions on the basis of hurt feelings, old history, misconceptions, or blind faith. There are many different ways of making key life decisions, and when one employs an ineffective one, the results can be enduringly painful.

In this two day workshop based on Dr. Yapko’s newest book, The Discriminating Therapist: Asking “How” Questions, Making Distinctions, and Finding Direction in Therapy, we will look at people through the lens of cognitive style and HOW they make the choices they make. Instead of following the therapy tradition of analyzing why someone makes the choices they make, The Discriminating Therapist focuses on how people choose. We will especially focus on what they failed to either notice or discriminate in their global response to some circumstance. From this gentler perspective, we can focus on the roles of missing skills or incorrect information relevant to making better decisions instead of simply pathologizing people. Through carefully constructed “how” questions that reveal the client’s ineffective decision-making framework, the goals of therapy quickly become clearer and the likelihood of hitting well defined therapy targets increases. The Discriminating Therapist provides an innovative and clearer approach to obtaining better and faster therapeutic results.

More details on this workshop

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize cognitive style and its effect on experience in general and symptomatic experience in particular.
  • Identify the role of global cognitions in client problems.
  • Relate how a low tolerance for ambiguity increases the likelihood of poor decision-making.
  • Ask “how” questions that identify the client’s experiential deficits (i.e., missing or incorrect information that work against his or her effective decision-making).
  • Recognize how a therapist’s cognitive style may hinder the treatment results.
  • Motivate the client to make key distinctions that regulate decision-making related to his or her presenting problems.
  • Identify and articulate discrimination criteria that help teach discrimination strategies
    Recognize how identifying more possible solutions to the client’s problem may prevent him or her from implementing them.

Early Bird Cost:

Until May 5th, 2017

Individual Registration: $475
CCC Alumni: $450
Full Time Student: $300

Regular Cost:

On/After May 5th, 2017

Individual Registration: $600
CCC Alumni: $500
Full Time Student: $425

Location:

Workshop to take place in Calgary. Specific location to be determined in March.

Register Online:

Individual
Student
CCC Alumni